Live Learning Course: Lung Cancer Screening

August 24-25
Phoenix, Arizona

CME credits: 11.25


Lung Cancer Screening Decision Counselor and Navigator Training

Shared decision making is an integral part of effective lung cancer screening. Lung Cancer Screening: Decision Counselor and Navigator Training Program aims to educate providers on how to appropriately facilitate shared decision making with patients who face the decision to undergo or not to undergo lung cancer screening.

Throughout the course, participants will learn about lung cancer screening, eligibility assessment, and aspects of tobacco treatment during six interactive sessions that will include role playing and evaluation around decision counseling.


Target Audience 

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants, as well as registered nurses and respiratory therapists in the role of lung cancer screening navigators, are encouraged to attend. 

This program in supported in part by an independent educational grant from AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP and Bristol-Myers Squibb Company.

Learning Objectives by Session

  1. The participant should be able to identify lung cancer screening eligibility criteria including the differences in recommendations between the United States Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
  2. The participant should be able to identify populations that may benefit most and least from lung cancer screening.
  3. The participant should be able to identify at least three benefits and three risks associated with lung cancer screening.
  4. The participant should be able to identify three phases of lung cancer screening implementation.
  5. The participant should be able to identify the essential components of an effective lung cancer screening program.
  6. The participant should be able to identify ways to incorporate tobacco treatment into lung cancer screening.

  1. The participant should be able to identify key challenges to shared decision making for lung cancer screening in primary care practice.
  2. The participant should be able to explain when lung cancer screening might be considered preference sensitive.
  3. The participant should able to identify the elements of a targeted, brief shared decision-making approach.
  4. The participant should be able to identify three criteria used to measure decision aid quality.
  5. The participant should be able to identity three basic components of decision aids that have been developed for use in lung cancer screening.

  1. The participant should be able to identify three stages of skilled helping.
  2. The participant should be able to identify three communication skills.
  3. The participant should be able to identify three elements of empathic presence.
  4. The participant should be able to identify three types of probes.
  5. The participant should be able to distinguish between helpful and unhelpful probes.

  1. The participant should be able to identify the correct definition of a decision situation.
  2. The participant should be able to identify the correct definition of a decision domain.
  3. The participant should be able to identify the correct definition of decision factors.
  4. The participant should be able to identify three goals of a decision counseling session.
  5. The participant should be able to identify five steps in a decision counseling session.

  1. In a decision counseling session, the participant should be able to elicit one to three decision factors that favor screening/not screening from the client.
  2. In a decision counseling session, the participant should be able to elicit how much each decision factor supports screening/not screening from the client.
  3. In a decision counseling session, the participant should be able to identify the top decision factors three or fewer) and elicit the rank order of importance for the decision factors.
  4. In a decision counseling session, the participant should be able to determine the relative importance of the decision factors.
  5. In a decision counseling session, the participant should be able to generate a summary report that clarifies the client’s screening preference, and review report results with the client.

Faculty

 Tanner J. Caverly, MD

Tanner J. Caverly, MD
Assistant Professor
Departments of Learning Health Sciences and Internal Medicine
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Dr. Caverly studies how to deliver high-value care in primary care settings, while also minimizing the use of low-value services. Currently, he is studying how decision support can help personalize cancer screening decisions within the intense time-constraints of primary care practice, where there is typically less than 5 minutes to discuss preventive services with patients.

Ron Myers, PhD

Ronald E. Myers, PhD
Director, Center for Health Decision
NCI-designated Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center of Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Ronald E. Myers received a DSW in Social Welfare Policy and a PhD in Medical Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He completed postdoctoral training in Behavioral Epidemiology at Fox Chase Cancer Center and served as an Associate Member, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. He then joined the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia as an Associate Professor and Associate Director for Population Science. Dr. Myers was appointed as a Professor and Director, Division of Population Science, Thomas Jefferson University in 2001, and, in 2006, he became the Director of the Center for Health Decision at NCI-designated Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center of Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Myers’ areas of research expertise include patient adherence to cancer screening; shared decision making in cancer risk assessment, screening, and treatment; and decision support in cancer clinical trials participation. He has conducted cancer prevention and control research for more than 32 years, has served on national and international grant review panels, has been principal investigator on numerous peer-reviewed research grants, has published widely in the field, and serves on the editorial boards of several high-impact professional journals.

M. Patricia Rivera, MD, FCCP

M. Patricia Rivera, MD, FCCP
Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (UNC)

Dr. Rivera is recognized as a pulmonologist with expertise in lung cancer and as a pioneer in the development of multidisciplinary lung cancer programs. She was instrumental in the development of the Multidisciplinary Thoracic Oncology Program (MTOP) at UNC, a program she has co-directed for 24 years. More recently, she developed and is the director of the Multidisciplinary Lung Cancer Screening Program at UNC. Dr. Rivera is Chair of the CHEST Thoracic Oncology NetWork.

Her research interests have focused on early detection of preinvasive bronchial lesions, toxicities caused by therapies in lung cancer, lung cancer in women, and, more recently, lung cancer screening. Dr. Rivera has been an active participant in the CHEST Lung Cancer Guidelines initiative and had an integral part in the guidelines development and implementation. She was co-investigator in NCI research grants to develop a lung cancer screening registry and shared-decision tools, currently an investigator in NIH-funded grant to examine the delivery, quality, and outcomes of lung cancer screening in North Carolina, and co-PI of a study to explore rural/urban disparities associated with biomarker testing.

Jamie Studts, PhD

Jamie L. Studts, PhD
Professor of Behavioral Science
University of Kentucky College of Medicine
Assistant Director, Cancer Prevention and Control
NCI-designated University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center
Lexington, Kentucky

Dr. Studts is a licensed clinical health psychologist by training, and his clinical and research interests address behavioral aspects of tobacco-related malignancies. His work involves development and testing of interventions to promote informed/shared decision making and behavior change among patients and clinicians regarding prevention, screening, and survivorship of lung and head/neck cancer. Dr. Studts served as a member of the Institute of Medicine National Cancer Policy Forum addressing Implementation of Lung Cancer Screening. He is currently a member of the Medical and Professional Advisory Board for the Lung Cancer Alliance and the American Cancer Society National Lung Cancer Roundtable, serving as the Chair of the Survivorship, Stigma, and Nihilism Task Group.

Nichole T. Tanner, MD, MS, FCCP

Nichole T. Tanner, MD, MS, FCCP
Associate Professor of Medicine
Co-Director, Lung Cancer Screening Program
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine
Medical University of South Carolina

Dr. Nichole Tanner is a lung cancer pulmonologist at the Ralph H. Johnson VA Hospital with a joint appointment as Associate Professor of Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Her research and clinical interests focus on lung cancer screening, disparities, pulmonary nodule evaluation, and the staging and diagnosis of lung cancer. She was one of eight site-leads for the national Veterans Affairs Lung Cancer Screening Demonstration Project, designed to determine the feasibility of implementing lung cancer screening in the VA. Dr. Tanner was the PI on a VA-funded health services grant to evaluate factors associated with shared decision making within the context of a lung cancer screening program. She is also the co-director of the NCI-designated Hollings Cancer Center lung cancer screening program at MUSC and co-investigator on an NCI grant to evaluate the implementation of smoking cessation within a lung cancer screening program. Dr. Tanner has published a number of manuscripts surrounding lung cancer diagnostics and screening.

Robert Volk, PhD

Robert Volk, PhD
Professor and Director
Head, Division Support Lab and Shared Decision-Making Collaborative
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas

Dr. Volk is a decision scientist and Professor in the Department of Health Services Research at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. His research focus is shared decision making, a process wherein patients and their health-care providers jointly make difficult clinical decisions when the optimal strategy is uncertain. His patient decision aids have received numerous awards for film and video production in the area of health care. He is Co-Chair of the Steering Committee for the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) Collaboration, and he chairs the Shared Decision-Making Task Group of the National Lung Cancer Roundtable. He was also a panel member for National Quality Forum’s patient decision aid certification project, which led to publication of their new standards in 2017. He also headed decision aid development for the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science, an AHRQ-funded center for translation of complex scientific information into materials for consumers, clinicians, and policymakers.

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Agenda

  • TIME
    TOPIC / PRESENTER
  • 6:45 AM – 7:45 AM
    Registration and Continental Breakfast
  • 7:45 AM – 8:00 AM
    Welcome and Introduction
    M. Patricia Rivera, MD, FCCP
  • 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM
    Lung Cancer Screening: Evidence and Special Populations
    Nichole T. Tanner, MD, MS, FCCP
  • 8:30 AM – 9:00 AM
    Lung Cancer Screening Eligibility: Age, Smoking History, and Comorbidities
    M. Patricia Rivera, MD, FCCP
  • 9:00 AM – 9:30 AM
    Lung Cancer Screening Implementation: Best Practices and Nuts and Bolts
    Nichole T. Tanner, MD, MS, FCCP
  • 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM
    Tobacco Treatment in Lung Cancer Screening
  • 10:00 AM – 10:15 AM
    Break
  • 10:15 AM – 10:45 AM
    Decision Aids and Decision Support Interventions
    Bob Volk, PhD
    Tanner J. Caverly, MD
  • 10:45 AM – 11:15 AM
    Use of Decision Aids in Clinical Care
    Bob Volk, PhD
    Tanner J. Caverly, MD
  • 11:15 AM – 11:45 AM
    Decision Aids in Lung Cancer Screening
    Tanner J. Caverly, MD
  • 11:45 AM – 12:00 PM
    Morning Wrap-up and Q & A
    M. Patricia Rivera, MD, FCCP
    Nichole T. Tanner, MD, MS, FCCP
    Robert Volk, PhD
    Tanner J. Caverly, MD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM
    Lunch
  • 1:15 PM – 2:00 PM
    Professional Helping Part 1: The Helping Relationship, Diversity, and Nondirective Empowerment
    Ron Myers, PhD
    Jamie Studts, PhD
  • 2:00 PM – 2:30 PM
    Professional Helping Part 2: Communication Skills, Empathic Listening, Probes, and Summarizing
    Ron Myers, PhD
    Jamie Studts, PhD
  • 2:30 PM – 3:00 PM
    Professional Helping Part 3: Values Deliberation, Preference Clarification, and Alignment With Options
    Ron Myers, PhD
    Jamie Studts, PhD
  • 3:00 PM – 3:15 PM
    Break
  • 3:15 PM – 3:45 PM
    Shared Decision-Making and Decision Counseling
    Jamie Studts, PhD
    Ron Myers, PhD
  • 3:45 PM – 4:45 PM
    Decision Counseling Demonstration
    Townhall style- all faculty to participate in demonstration, then divide participants into 2-4 groups depending on # of participants to discuss questions relevant to the demonstration and present their discussion to the larger group.
  • 4:45 PM – 5:00 PM
    Afternoon Wrap-up and Q & A
    All Faculty

  • TIME
    TOPIC / PRESENTER
  • 6:45 AM – 7:45 AM
    Continental Breakfast
  • 7:45 AM – 8:00 AM
    Introduction to Decision Counseling Sessions
    Ron Myers, PhD
  • 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM
    Decision Counseling Role Play and Evaluation
    All Faculty
  • 9:30 AM – 9:45 AM
    Break
  • 9:45 AM – 11:15 AM
    Decision Counseling Role Play and Evaluation
    All Faculty
  • 11:15 AM – 11:45 AM
    Wrap-up and Adjurn
    All Faculty